Alternative Funding for Work Zone ITS Fact Sheet

Nearly everyone who understands work zone ITS knows it is a cost-effective way of mitigating the traffic impacts of major and sometimes even minor road construction projects. Studies have proven the value of these systems. But DOTs will often tell you they don’t have the funding to pay for it.  The FHWA encourages states to use work zone ITS. They will pay for these systems through conventional construction funding. So, when states say they don’t have the funding they mean they haven’t found a pot of money outside of the money they use for asphalt and concrete.

FHWA wants to address that problem. They have just published the “Alternative Funding for Work Zone ITS Fact Sheet”. In it they document how Illinois uses HSIP funds to pay for Work Zone ITS. Download a copy of the fact sheet HERE.

FHWA says this is a highly underutilized funding mechanism. According to the fact sheet, “While some states use HSIP funds for work zone purposes, many state DOTs do not tap into this resource. Out of the more than 4,000 HSIP projects referenced in the 2016 HSIP National Summary Report, only 13 were work zone-related projects.”

Work Zone ITS Blog addressed the efforts of Matthew Daeda and Illinois DOT on May 12, 2016. We told you that this contracting method offers several advantages:

  1. The state only pays when the system is needed.
  2. They work directly with the vendor and that greatly improves communication.
  3. Staff has direct access to the system data and to make changes.
  4. By bidding for each district local companies are more likely to win, thus reducing response time.

 

This fact sheet is a BIG deal! States are always saying they don’t have the funding. This is one way of getting it. And the Feds aren’t just allowing this. They are encouraging states to use HSIP funds for work zone ITS.

States do need to identify work zone safety as a SHSP Focus Area and provide the data to support that decision. According to the National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse, there were 799 fatalities in US work zones in 2017, up from the previous three-year average of 764. That’s not much when compared to the total roadway fatalities of 37,133.

But work zones are always a safety issue. States can and should include them in their Strategic Highway Safety Plans (SHSP) for a variety of reasons. Work zones force drivers to process more information and react faster than they normally do outside of work zones. That’s why crashes attributable to distracted driving, speeding, aggressive driving, and impaired driving often show up first in work zones. Furthermore, solutions that work in work zones may have applications elsewhere.

In 2017 overall fatalities declined nationally while work zone fatalities increased. Any state with this same disparity should include work zones in the SHSP. Many states have recently increased funding for road construction. They, too, will unfortunately see an associated increase in work zone fatalities. And, again, they to should include work zones in their SHSPs.

This is a wonderful tool. Thank you to Todd Peterson and Jawad Paracha for putting it together. Now we all just need to get his in front of the decision makers in our states!

 

The State of the Work Zone ITS Industry – 2018

We just enjoyed the 4th of July holiday. As we sat on the deck consuming bar-b-que and adult beverages we considered the state of the work zone ITS industry. We really have come a long way in the past year and that deserves recognition and a quick look back.

One of the most important and most overlooked recent changes is the blurring of the lines between the permanent ITS infrastructure world and the work zone ITS world. At last month’s ITS America show in Detroit, HERE demonstrated their new ability to incorporate live data feeds from work zones along with their partners including software provider GEWI and work zone ITS supplier iCone.

Waze is also incorporating real-time work zone data feeds in their traffic reporting. Both traffic data providers understand the importance of immediate and accurate work zone reporting and are working internally to make better use of our data.

This blurring is going the other direction as well, as Work Area Protection (formerly ASTI Transportation) now offers the option of including Iteris probe data in work zone travel and delay time calculations.

This blurring of the lines may be more important than we realize. Because it becomes less about us versus them for funding and more about an ITS system that works all of the time – especially in work zones. Work zones have always been an afterthought with ITS practitioners. But that is changing. They now understand that the single largest cause of nonrecurring congestion is work zones. And they are working to address that with their permanent systems.

In a recent article in Better Roads Magazine Frank Zucco of Wanco explained that work zone ITS is now much less expensive. Large, elaborate systems are still available and make sense for multi-year projects with major traffic impacts. But more and more simple systems are now being used for queue detection, trucks entering and dynamic merge applications. And, as Frank points out, those are now very dependable and inexpensive, making them a cost-effective solution for most projects.

Research now validates what we all knew intuitively. Queue detection, in particular, has shown major benefits according to the Texas Transportation Institute and AASHTO. We touched on this milestone two years ago in our post “The State of the Work Zone ITS Industry” published on 4/28/16.

And, lastly, work zone ITS helps facilitate the proliferation of automated and autonomous vehicles. Without real time reporting of work zones, AVs are left to navigate them on their own. And the AV world now understands that. We have become a part of the conversation. At the Automated Vehicle Symposium later this month in San Francisco sessions about work zones will be included for the third year in a row. See #33: “OEM/DOT Dialog on Dedicated Lanes, Work Zones and Shared Data” on July 11th. Autonomous vehicles are a big story that will only get bigger. Funding and research will flow to our industry as a result of these conversations.

As an industry, we aren’t yet to the point where our systems are used everywhere they could help. But we can finally see that light at the end of the tunnel.

Work Zone Traffic Control “Down-Under”

We just returned from a wonderful trip to Australia where we spoke to the Traffic Management Association of Australia (TMAA) about work zone ITS. Their members were all excited and focused on finding safer, more efficient ways to manage their work zones.

The program was packed full of interesting speakers and a variety of timely topics. They also gave us all just the right amount of time to discuss those topics between sessions. It was very well run.

The attendees seemed to enjoy talking to Americans and all asked what we thought of the meeting. My first answer was always the same: traffic control companies in both countries share the exact same set of problems:

1) Speeding in work zones.

2) End-of-queue crashes.

3) Hiring, training and retaining good employees.

4) A perception by the driving public that we are there to make their lives miserable.

5) Insufficient funding for maintenance and construction.

6) Changing standards and levels of enforcement from one state to the next.

7) Varying commitment and funding levels from one state to the next.

Just like ATSSA, the TMAA brings contractors, manufacturers, academia and government agencies together to discuss these problems and identify solutions. The TMAA does an especially good job of this. We look forward to learning more from them in the years to come!