Distracted Driving and Work Zones

We all know that distracted driving is resulting in increased fatalities on our roadways. The National Safety Council reported a 6% increase in fatalities in 2016. According to the National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse, overall roadways fatalities increased 13% from 2013 to 2016. And during that same period, work zone fatalities increased 28%!

We enjoyed a period of dramatic decline in these numbers in the early 2000’s and then in 2013 they suddenly began to climb again. A small part of that change was due to improving economic activity and the increase in vehicle miles traveled that came as a result. But far more is due to other factors and distracted driving certainly tops the list.

The National Safety Council reports that 47% of drivers feel comfortable texting while they are driving. But we know that, in fact, texting while driving often increases reaction times more than driving under the influence.

But the problem is bigger than just that. In a recent article by Dr. Carl Marci, a neuroscientist writing in the January 4th issue of Perspectives magazine (http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2018/perspectives-driving-while-distracted-the-challenges-of-measuring-behavior-in-complex-environments.html), he said that our cars may be contributing to the distracted driving problem as well! This question occurred to him driving home one night so he ran a test using standard bio-metric equipment on a short drive on an unfamiliar road in Boston. The results showed the driver looked at his or her phone 60 times during a ten minute trip! A study by Zendrive reinforces these findings. They found that drivers use their phones for 88% of their trips.

Dr. Marci explains this by examining the way we use our phones outside of our vehicles. Any time we are bored, we look at our phone. Sitting at home in front of the TV, standing on a street corner waiting for a bus, or sitting in slow a meeting at work – we all check our phones when we get bored. And then we are often rewarded for doing so with a response from others. Email and social media have changed the way we act in very profound and far-reaching ways. And that can’t be turned off when we get behind the wheel.

Furthermore, our cars are becoming very comfortable. They resemble our living rooms more every day. Elaborate electronics help guide us to our destination, provide entertainment, and interface with our phones calling and communications applications.

We do use our cars electronics and phones for legitimate reasons while driving. They give us directions to our destination. They warn us of traffic problems along our planned route. They tell us of weather changes that may be important. So our phones & automotive electronics can help us get where we are going more safely. But once we use these for legitimate reasons, we can’t put them down. Or our drive becomes boring or our phone beeps to announce a new text, and we can’t seem to wait until we stop to check those messages.

So, back to work zones. A 28% increase in work zone fatalities cannot be ignored. Distracted driving is a growing and potentially catastrophic trend for work zones. Work zone ITS has always helped to reduce crashes. But this trend in distracted driving makes the use of work zone ITS all the more important. End of queue systems, dynamic merge systems, and variable speed limit systems can all get drivers attention, improve their work zone awareness, and help mitigate the effects of distracted driving. Let’s get ahead of this trend now before it gets any worse.

One thought on “Distracted Driving and Work Zones

  1. Pingback: Distracted Driving and Work Zones – CaHill

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