Google Maps are Wrong!

At any given time, perhaps 5% of Google Maps data is wrong. And the reason is simple. Construction traffic control requires contractors to close lanes, redirect traffic into oncoming lanes, or close roads altogether until the work has been completed. Those closures are reported to state and local agencies. And those reports are picked up by Google and other traffic data aggregators. But they are often wrong or out of date.

In most states, contractors are required to request permission to close a lane. That request must be made well in advance of the date on which they wish to close the lane, 7 to 10 days on average. By the time that day comes long, construction delays, weather, and other issues often postpone the work and the lane closure does not take place.

Contractors also often make several requests so they will have a multi-day window in which they can perform the work. The days they don’t work are called ghost closures. Some states have moved to eliminate ghost closures by requiring contractors to call the local traffic management center when the lane is taken and again when it is opened back up. This certainly helps, but it does not eliminate the problem altogether.

To make matters worse, many closures are never reported at all. Utility companies are notorious for closing lanes without permission. They reason that they are only there for a short time and so won’t affect traffic all that much. But as traffic becomes more dependent on accurate travel time and route information, any disruption causes problems, and may even be dangerous.

Incident response closes lanes; school crossing guards stop traffic; special events close roads and reroute traffic; flooding, fires and other environmental events also result in route closures and restrictions.

This is an important point of discussion in the automated/autonomous vehicle world, too. If autonomous vehicles depend on historic GPS data to plan and drive a route, they will run into unexpected construction. So they must decide how they will adapt to changes in geometry, in the number and location of lanes, and much more. And delays resulting from these closed lanes and detours should be measured and included in any travel time algorithms.

It is worth noting that the folks in the traffic data companies know of the problem but they can’t solve it on their own. Industry is beginning to fill this need. Arrow boards and flagger stop/slow paddles are being reinvented to become “smart devices”. They report in automatically when work begins and ends. And they also report their precise location. As the work moves, that is reported as well, so map data for work zones can now be reported in real time.

Much work remains to be done. But the solution to this problem is clear. The closures must be reported in real time from the field. And that includes any changes in geometry when lanes are temporarily shifted in one direction or another. Highway construction, incident response and special events all experience unexpected changes on a daily and often hourly basis. Maps must reflect those changes if our system is to be as safe and efficient as possible.

One thought on “Google Maps are Wrong!

  1. Great post. While I can’t speak on behalf of FHWA it is my personal opinion that the lack of consistent, timely, and sufficiently detailed data on work zone activity has broad implications for exactly the reasons described. Accordingly, I will be leading an initiative within FHWA to examine the role of work zone activity data among various stakeholders, towards the goal of helping to define a recommended practice that supports the variety of ways in work zone activity is being used now, and will be needed in the future. Stay tuned…

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