Sending Work Zone Warnings to Cell Phones

workzone-alertThe Minnesota Department of Transportation just released a study looking at one way of triggering in-vehicle messages in vehicles approaching work zones. The authors Chen-Fu Liao and Max Donath of the University of Minnesota tested the concept of sending low-energy BlueTooth messages to Android phones equipped with a custom app they call Workzone Alert.

The app triggers an audible, visible and/or tactile warning to the driver as he or she approaches a work zone. Drivers who are speeding can also be warned to slow down. And the app can even disable calling and texting while within the confines of the work zone.

Report 2016-38 entitled “Investigating the Effectiveness of Using BlueTooth Low-Energy Technology to Trigger In-Vehicle Messages in Work Zones” was published by the Minnesota DOT. You can download a copy HERE.

 

Their design worked well and proved that vehicles traveling at speeds of up to 70 MPH could receive warning messages as they approached a work zone.

We have talked about a future with DSRC “pods” transmitting to vehicles. We have also talked about those same DSRC devices attached to PCMS as a stop gap to reach all vehicles until nearly all are equipped with receivers. But a better way might be through 5G cell service as that is already available and in most vehicles.

These “BLE tags” use very little power so they could be attached to message signs or arrow boards without affecting the signs performance. When packaged with a small battery they could also be attached to a simple sign post or overpass.

The downside is the cell phones must currently be placed into a BlueTooth discover mode to find existing tags. This uses more power and results in reductions in charge life for the phones. But if this technology continues to show promise, the Android and iPhone operating systems could surely be changed to receive these messages in something similar to a discover mode but one that uses far less power when not receiving. The BLE tag locations are stored allowing phones to run Workzone Alert in background except when passing known tag locations.

They also attempted to make the technology easy to deploy. A second app was developed to make it easy for traffic control contractors to update the message that Workzone Alert displays for a specific BLE tag.

Work at the U of M continues. The current, second phase of research is looking at human-factors considerations for alerts. What wording and format should be used to get the best results? In the third phase they will look at how best to maintain the BLE tag database, who should be able to make changes, and if it is practical to tie this into 511, Waze or Google Maps. Stay tuned as this promises to develop quickly!

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